May 11

Tip #1: Know yourself, better navigate a new culture

More posts are to come regarding things important to know about living abroad and American culture, but let me offer the best tip first.  Perhaps you’ve heard the quote, “No matter where you go, there you are.”  I think most of us focus on the words “where” and “there.”  I would offer that instead the pronoun “you” be emphasized.  I would rewrite it this way: “No matter where YOU go, there YOU are.”

So who are you?  Do you really know?  Certainly you have some ideas, but wouldn’t it be nice to have someone else confirm and clarify that for you?  If you are a computer technician and a computer has a problem, you likely know how to fix it because you know a great deal about computers (The rest of us stand in awe of your expediency!).

However, if your personal “system” breaks down, (and I can assure you that somewhere along your international journey it will have weaknesses found) do you know what strategies to put into place?  Personal reflection is important in this process, including thinking through what can drive you crazy and what you can do to help make a bad day better.  A well-known American adage is “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  Do you know your prevention strategy?

One tool I recommend is taking the Personality Profile.  Most American businesses and many other cultures use tools like this to help with teamwork and success in the workplace.  Students will often take personality assessments to help narrow career choices.

The Personality Profile I offer is through Dan Miller’s 48 Days to the Work You Love system.  This Personality Profile offers details unlike any other I have seen or taken.  It is designed with a Christian world view, and at first I thought about removing it.  Then it occurred to me that if I were moving to a Buddhist culture, like Thailand for example, it would be very interesting to see what heroes and VIPs I might be like from that culture’s world (point of) view.  If the Christian aspects are not of interest, you can just skip over that analysis.  The major component is the DISC, which at its core is secular-based and discusses personality traits.

If desired, you may request a consultation to review your Personality Profile after taking it.  While the profile only takes about 20-30 minutes to take, you will get around 30 pages of feedback.  While much of the Personality Profile results will likely be easy to follow, you are welcome to contact me to schedule a professional consultation.

Interested?  Contact me below for more information or email me at TheKimCenter@yahoo.com.  Get to know your personal culture, better navigate a new culture.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.